Death Valley High :: Doom, In Full Bloom

Written by on January 28, 2010 in January 28, 2010, Music Reviews - Comments Off
Death Valley High

When we were first introduced to the kids of Death Valley High, we were greeted with distorted guitar riffs mix-matched with pop-punk groove tones, which were later defined as “Doom Pop”. But that was then during the mists of Death Valley High’s critically acclaimed, “The Similarities of the Loveless and the Undead”. Now is the time for, the follow-up’s turn, hence DHV presents to you “Doom, In Full Blood”.

A self-produced effort that has boasted the mixing talents of Alex Newport (Mars Volta, At The Drive-In, and The Locust) and longtime collaborator Eric Stenman (Thrice, MSTRKRFT, and Senses Fail). Death Valley High features Reyka Osburn (Tinfed, Ghostride) on vocals, guitar and synths; Adam Bannister on drums; Chris Sanders on guitar along with Huffy Hafera on bass for what Reyka calls “DHV’s strongest and most dedicated lineup to date; Inglorious Basterds-style”.

Now to the fun part, this highly anticipated follow up album precisely brings out that “doom pop” sensation that is truly over written when it gets thrown about in every possible direction. Opener “Black Friday,” immediately overrides the listener’s hearing rights, by screaming directly into the ear cannel that gets bang right against the ear cannel’s eardrum. This echoing vibration of drum ethics that instantly bounces against the guitars segmental is unbelievable. Having the vocal effects lash out at you like a tiger ready to lash out upon its prey.

“She Wants To Kill”, “Days and Days”, and “Thru Hell”, are truly the attention graspers that overrun the music altogether by which the music constantly rushes right at you, all of the instruments working together as the lyrics being out spoken is considerably in deep discussion about the pain, suffering and ethics of fear that keeps the listener in anticipation of more. Death Valley High is back in session and accepting enrollment into their pop-punk courses with promising doom pop ethics that won’t leave utter disappoint in its signature.